5 Mindfulness Myths Debunked

Mindfulness involves paying attention to the present, on purpose, without judgement.

I run a lot of mindfulness introduction sessions in the workplace in which I introduce people to what mindfulness is, why we might need it, and how it can be useful in helping us manage our mental health and well-being. In those sessions, as well as introducing people to what mindfulness is it is equally important to let people know what it isn’t.

So here I summarise and debunk some of the top mindfulness myths…

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Being mindful with a mini egg

Mindfulness involves deliberately paying attention to the present, on purpose and without judgement. As well as cultivating mindfulness through meditation exercises, it is something you can also try with everyday activities.

Here I've adapted a short mindful eating practice for you to try with a small chocolate egg this Easter -  or any other chocolate you happen to have lying around...I hope you enjoy it:)

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How does mindfulness help break the myth of multitasking?

The potential benefits of mindfulness in terms of stress-reduction are well reported, but increasingly the other potential benefits, including improved engagement, enhanced relationships, productivity, focus and concentration are gaining attention, particularly in the corporate world.

I didn’t do a mindfulness course because I wanted to be more productive. I took an 8-week course because I work in a busy job as a city solicitor, that job can sometimes involve pressure and long-hours and I used to worry and churn things over an unnecessary amount in a way which I recognised probably wasn’t very helpful. I have supportive colleagues, and there wasn’t one particular ‘trigger’ moment that led to me doing the course – I just wanted a tool to be able to proactively manage my mental health and well-being; one that would help me worry less and enjoy life more.

I was quite surprised therefore when I found that mindfulness seemed to produce other benefits aside from the stress reduction – the main one I noticed in the workplace was that as I did the course, and more likely as I continued to practice mindfulness afterwards, it stopped me ‘faffing’ as much.  This probably surprised me because I wouldn’t have ever really described myself as a ‘faffer’ in a work context. Worrier, yes; faffer, no.

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